Blog

CORDIO samples Tanzania

April 3rd, 2017 Global FinPrint On March 13th 2017, representatives from Kenya and Mozambique set off by road from Mombasa on the Kenyan coast to Tanga, 175km south of Mombasa, in Tanzania, to learn how to do baited remote underwater video surveys (BRUVs) to record shark populations as a part of the Global FinPrint project. The travelers were myself, Clay Obota, Kennedy Osuka, and…

Lessons from coral reef “bright spots”

February 7th, 2017 Global FinPrint Millions of people depend on healthy coral reef ecosystems for food security and their livelihoods. This study analyzed data from 2514 coral reefs from 46 countries to understand how reef fish biomass is related to socioeconomic drivers and environmental conditions. "Bright spots" and "dark spots" were compared. Bright spots are not simply remote areas with…

Tracking tiger sharks

December 2nd, 2016 Global FinPrint Although some people may picture sharks as intimidating predators that roam long distances, that’s not the case for many of the more than 400 species. There are also small sharks and those that spend most or part of their lives in one area – a pattern known as residency. When it comes to tiger sharks,…

A predator’s role in storing carbon

November 7th, 2016 Global FinPrint When you think about carbon (C) storage in an ecosystem, you may think about a lush tropical forest sucking up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. What isn't considered as often is coastal marine ecosystems, which take up C 40 times faster than tropical forests. An estimated 25 billion tons of C is buried in vegetated…

These single ladies don’t need a man

October 28th, 2016 Global FinPrint The Internet exploded last year with news of a vertebrate capable of producing offspring without sex. Billions of people across the globe tuned in to learn about the smalltooth sawfish’s newly discovered ability. The study was led by our lead principal investigator, Dr. Demian Chapman, and his Ph.D. student, Andrew Fields. This ability, scientifically known as…
© Katie Flowers

Global patterns of shark and ray bycatch

October 18th, 2016 Global FinPrint The left-behind, the unwanted, the unmanaged - whatever you want to call it, bycatch is prevalent in commercial fisheries. Sharks and rays are at risk of becoming bycatch in all commercial fisheries. So what exactly is bycatch? Bycatch is the discarded (dead or alive) catch and/or unmanaged catch from fisheries. While fishing for particular species, fishers often…

Protecting migrating shark species isn’t always easy

October 4th, 2016 Global FinPrint It’s no surprise to anyone that sharks can move. What may be surprising is that some shark species can move thousands of kilometers, traveling across multiple jurisdictions. When sharks swim across state, national, and international boundaries they are exposing themselves to varying levels of threats and protections. In order for conservation measures to be effective…

How marine protected areas support healthy coral reefs

September 28th, 2016 Global FinPrint Many of our researchers are SCUBA divers, and we like to think that many of our followers also enjoy spending time under the sea or at the very least learning about it. It's no wonder that we enjoy diving on vibrant reefs with a diversity of species. Of course, we also love getting the opportunity…

Mozambique Mission 2016

September 27th, 2016 Global FinPrint The Marine Megafauna Foundation (MMF) has been researching large fish such as sharks and rays in southern Mozambique for over 10 years. So we were really excited when the Global FinPrint research team invited us to help them with the reef assessment in this beautiful and biodiverse part of Mozambique. The goal of this collaboration…

Shark sanctuaries need enforcement

September 21st, 2016 Global FinPrint When you think of a shark sanctuary what do you imagine? Perhaps a beautiful coral reef that is a blue haven for sharks? Hold that thought while we take a moment to examine reality through the eyes of science. A recent study in Palau evaluated the world’s first shark sanctuary using underwater visual surveys. This…

Dining in fear: the influence of predator and prey behavior on the health of coral reef ecosystems

September 16th, 2016 Global FinPrint Imagine: you're quietly enjoying your breakfast when suddenly a lion barges through your front door. Do you continue eating? Run for cover? The answer for you, and other potential prey, is pretty clear. For small, plant-eating fish living on coral reefs, this is a constant threat. So much so that even just the fear of a potential predator, like…

Bahamas Mission 2016

September 13th, 2016 Global FinPrint In 2016, the Chapman lab sampled six reefs in the Bahamas, thanks to the Moore Bahamas Foundation, Cape Eleuthera Institute, and the International SeaKeepers Society. In collaboration with these organizations, student Gina Clementi, project coordinator Jasmine Valentin-Albanese, and volunteer Jessica Quinlan set a total of 278 baited remote underwater videos (BRUVs), which produced amazing data and…

Impacts of sharks on coral reef ecosystems

September 9th, 2016 Global FinPrint Do healthy reefs need sharks? This is one of the most misunderstood questions in coral reef ecology. Shark populations are declining due to habitat loss, overfishing, and other stressors. It is important to understand how these losses could affect the rest of the ecosystem. Understanding the predator-prey interactions between herbivores and sharks is crucial for…

Caring for conservation: the value of imagery

September 9th, 2016 Global FinPrint I am passionate about marine life, and I just love sharks. One of my favourite jobs is documenting shark and ray research in the field. I have worked with Dr. Mark Meekan on the sharks of Palau, the manta rays of Hanifaru and the whale sharks of Ningaloo Reef. When he asked me to join…

White sharks: finding mates nearby

September 5th, 2016 Global FinPrint Would you want to swim across the ocean to find a mate? Probably not, and neither do great white sharks. A recent study showed that white sharks are breeding on the side of the Atlantic Ocean where they were born despite their tendency to venture into the open ocean. The results revealed two distinct populations…