Dining in fear: the influence of predator and prey behavior on the health of coral reef ecosystems

Publication specs

Title: Reefscapes of fear: predation risk and reef heterogeneity interact to shape herbivore foraging behaviour
Authors: Laura B. Catano, Maria C. Rojas, Ryan J. Malossi, Joseph R. Peters, Michael R. Heithaus, James W. Fourqurean and Deron E. Burkepile
Journal: Journal of Animal Ecology
Year: 2015

Imagine: you’re quietly enjoying your breakfast when suddenly a lion barges through your front door. Do you continue eating? Run for cover? The answer for you, and other potential prey, is pretty clear. For small, plant-eating fish living on coral reefs, this is a constant threat. So much so that even just the fear of a potential predator, like sharks and grouper, can alter their behavior. While that may seem obvious, a recent study has revealed something not quite so intuitive – this fear is actually good for the entire coral reef ecosystem.

The findings of this study suggest something rather surprising – without predators, herbivorous fish cannot fulfill their normal function on the reef. Reefs come in a variety of structures and are comprised of a multitude of interdependent organisms. The feeding behavior of these fish, like surgeonfish and parrotfish, are influenced by both the structure of the reef and their predators. In the absence of predators, or in this case a grouper decoy, the fish ate almost two times more seagrass than when the decoy was present. In areas with and without complex reef structure, the fish did not eat as much when the grouper decoy was present.

Complex reef habitats don’t offer easy escape or shelter, which means that in areas with predators lurking, fish spend more time trying to find safe spaces rather than grazing. According to these findings, herbivorous fish concentrate their feeding to areas where they are less likely to encounter a roving predator, leaving more space for coral to settle, grow, and thrive. Reefs without predators encourage grazing across larger areas, leaving less open space for young coral to survive. This study suggests that this interplay – between predator, prey, and ecosystem – is crucial for healthy reefs.

Global FinPrint

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.